AccueilEssaisHistoireDiscussionsRecensionsFreud  RSS
BlogConfĂ©rencesLivresBiblioSéminairesÉditoAdressesAssociationsLiens

Bibliographies

6 livres

Side Effects
Adam Phillips

Side Effects

(New-York, Harper Perennial, 2007)

Psychoanalysis as a form of therapy works by attending to the patient's side effects, that is, what falls out of his pockets once he starts speaking'. Undergoing psychoanalytic treatment is in many ways like reading a powerful work of literature a leap into the dark, an opportunity to think the strangeness of your own thoughts.
It is impossible to know beforehand the effect it will have. All we can do, as the essays in this book suggest, is see where the side effects will lead us. And that is part of the excitement of being alive.
As erudite, observant and eloquent as ever, Adam Phillips is the perfect guide for this fascinating journey into the links between psychoanalysis, literature and the living of our everyday lives.



Equals
Adam Phillips

Equals

(Londres, Faber & Faber, 2002)

Synopsis
Does psychoanalysis teach us that freedom and equality are impossible for human beings? With all his customary grace and deftness, the suthor explores this question and many others in a liberating new collection of essays. He demonstrates how psychoanalysis - as a treatment and an experience and a way of reading - can like democracy, allow people to speak and be heard.



Promises, Promises: Essays on Poetry and Psychoanalysis
Adam Phillips

Promises, Promises: Essays on Poetry and Psychoanalysis

(New-York, Basic Books, 2002)

From Library Journal
Phillips, a well-known psychotherapist and literary critic, believes that the "talking cure" of psychoanalysis, dependent as it is upon language, is inextricably linked to literature. Accordingly, he has produced a number of insightful essays that explore the relationship between the literary arts and the unconscious. In this new collection of book reviews, lectures, and critical pieces, Phillips juxtaposes anecdotes from his own psychotherapy practice with discussions of works by an eclectic group of authors: A.E. Housman, Melanie Klein, Fernando Pessoa, Fritz Wittels, and Hart Crane, to name just a few. Not surprisingly, he also includes liberal references in many of the pieces to Freud's writings and theories. A useful addition to interdisciplinary studies, this unique book is recommended for academic collections. Ellen Sullivan, Ferguson Lib., Stamford, CT
(Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.)


Darwin's Worms
Adam Phillips

Darwin's Worms

(New-York, Basic Books, 2001)


Synopsis
Darwin and Freud, it seems, took God out of the big picture and left us in a world determined by nature and overshadowed by mortality. In this text the author considers how these giants of science felt about death, and develops a new understanding of ageing, loss - and the art of transience. 148 pages.



Terrors and Experts
Adam Phillips

Terrors and Experts

(Cambridge, Havard University Press, 1997)

From The Boston Review
Adam Phillips has written another perkily amusing book of essays about psychoanalysis. Packed with quotable quotes and wise non-sequiturs, at times inspiring, at others pretentiously obscure, the book reads like a literary evocation of the unconscious while also making some sensible points. Phillips argues that psychoanalysis works a lot better as critique than prescription: When analysts bank on expertise, supplanting a patient's knowledge with their own ("You're not afraid of horses, you just want to kill your father"), they betray the hope for freedom from authorities that brings patients into treatment in the first place. But then, Phillips says, psychoanalysis is closer to parapsychology or religion than it is to medical treatment. It doesn't provide knowledge but experience, and it doesn't need experts to practice it -- or defend it. "Nobody needs psychoanalysis," Phillips reminds us, "but some people might want it."
(Copyright © 1996, Boston Review. All rights reserved.)


On Kissing, Tickling, and Being Bored: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Unexamined Life
Adam Phillips

On Kissing, Tickling, and Being Bored: Psychoanalytic Essays on the Unexamined Life

(Londres, Faber & Faber, 1993)

'Adam Phillips dismantles with shrewd glee and inspired brilliance one after another the thoughtless but dogged "truths" of psychoanalysis.' (Christopher Bollas)

Adam Phillips focuses on a variety of subjects rarely investigated by psychoanalysis--such things as kissing, worrying, risk, and solitude. Phillips rejects the common notion that only the examined life is worth living, asserting that one's psychic health depends on establishing a realm of life that successfully resists interpretation. (Ingram)


 


.
.
Auteurs :
Karl Abraham
Joël Bernat
Christopher Bollas
Derek Bolton
Pierre-Henri Castel
Alain de Mijolla
Erik H. Erikson
W. R. D. Fairbairn
Sandor Ferenczi
Antoine Fratini
AndrAndré Green
André Green
Joel Kanter
Jean-Claude Lavie
Bernd Nitzschke
Adam Phillips
Neil Pickering
Luiz Eduardo Prado de Oliveira
Thierry Simonelli
Donald Winnicott

.
.

- Freud 1877-1900
- Sigmund Freud
- Gesammelte Werke
- Correspondance
- Karl Abraham

- Glossaire traduction




Info